ANALYZING RESULTS...
George W. Rozakis, MD

Dr. Rozakis is a board certified biomedical engineer who studied medicine at Cornell Medical Center and studied Ophthalmology at the Duke Eye Center.

Dr. Rozakis worked in the field of Advanced Wellness for over 15 years. He has applied this science to many conditions but most notably to macular degeneration and patients with migraine. Dr. Rozakis won the advancements in healthcare award in Cleveland, Ohio (beating out the Cleveland Clinic) in 2015 for his work in Advanced Wellness and advocates for this approach to health care to his patients and colleagues.

Dr. Rozakis pioneered the field of Lasik refractive surgery, phakic refractive lenses, and the use of hormones and other advanced testing to treat macular degeneration. He wrote a textbook on refractive surgery and holds multiple patents. He was one of the first surgeons in the world to perform LASIK. In 1998, he was voted by his peers to receive an international award for his contributions to LASIK refractive surgery. Dr. Rozakis published an extensive textbook on refractive surgery that was read throughout the world and even translated into Japanese.

Brian Bakke, Ph.D.

Dr. Bakke serves as a science advisor to the Macular Program. Dr. Bakke holds a PhD in bio-organic chemistry and his thesis work focused on the development of DNA alkylating agents for use as drug delivery systems. His post-doctoral work was focused on the development of iso-adenosine analogues as methylation pathway inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

Dr. Bakke also holds a master’s degree in human nutrition from Columbia University. His master’s thesis work focused on studying the clinical nutrition practice patterns used by eye professionals in the prevention and treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). In conjunction with his master's thesis work, Dr. Bakke completed a 1-year clinical nutrition program for health professionals through Columbia University Medical Center and the Institute of Human Nutrition.    

Prior to partnering with the Macular Program, Dr. Bakke spent 6 years working as chief science officer with a medical consulting company. His work as chief science officer focused on collaborating with primary care physicians in developing personalized nutrition and bioidentical hormone based care plans for improving clinical outcomes for patients with complex medical conditions. Previously, Dr. Bakke spent 7 years working with the multi-national chemistry, biotechnology and life science companies BASF and Syngenta as a senior chemist. 
Sajad Zalzala, M.D.

Board Certified in Family Medicine, Dr. Sajad Zalzala joined Dr. Rozakis' mission for Advanced Wellness in epigenetics to be at the forefront of not only technological innovation but towards the movement toward more personalized health, fitness, and medicine.

With special interests in Holistic and Functional Medicine and a background in Computer Science, his philosophy towards health focuses on identifying structural imbalances that influence disease, and defining the underlying causes of poor health—not just the sum of the symptoms. 

Combining his experience and practice, he believes quantifying the healthcare experience can lead to quicker and more lasting change. 
Scott Sedlacek, OD

Dr. Scott is proud to have grown up right in this area and now enjoys being able to contribute to the community from which he came. He moved to Olmsted Township in 2004 and resides here with his wife, Kim, and their combined five children.

His first job while at Berea High School was actually working for an eye doctor, and that’s when he knew it was his calling. Throughout his four years at Miami University, and then four years at The Ohio State University, he worked in several Optometry offices gaining experience. In 1998 he became an Optometrist himself and has truly enjoyed his chosen profession every day since.

Immediately upon beginning his practice he returned to the area where he grew up and began volunteering a tremendous amount of time through several organizations. His goal was to positively benefit the lives of others. His efforts have expanded state-wide where annually he now offers career day programs to over 1,000 students, completes free vision screenings for over 2,000 students, and in addition presents various educational programs to another 2,000 students in 50 different schools.

Dr. Scott has run several marathons, completed a triathlon, and also a 50K trail race. He enjoys playing soccer, golf, and instruments including the guitar. He roots for all Cleveland sports teams, The Buckeyes, and The Chelsea Futbol Club. He also enjoys riding motorcycles and dirt bikes with his son.

Tori Eaton, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Tori received her Bachelor of Science in Dietetics and Nutrition from Missouri State University. She finished her graduate certificate from Iowa State University where she completed over 1,200 hours of supervised practice in clinical and community nutrition, including a month of research in rural India. She’s an active member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine, and she's currently enrolled in the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Certified Practitioner course. She has over 3 years of experience with therapeutic diets, chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune diseases and weight management.


The Science & Our Clinical Story
A problem well stated is a problem half solved. 

What is the problem with macular degeneration?  

Let’s answer. 

The problem that defines macular degeneration is sickness of the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). 

These are important cells that sit underneath the photoreceptor cells of the macula, which are the light-sensitive cells that allow for vision. 

Here are pictures of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells below the photoreceptors rods and cones.
The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a very active layer of cells. The cell's role it is to keep the photoreceptors working correctly. When the RPE cells start to deteriorate, vision declines.

So naturally, a possible pathway to prevention for macular degeneration involves optimizing the health of these critical cells.

Does that make sense? It is worth repeating... 

The possible pathway to preventing macular degeneration is through optimizing the health of the RPE cells.

To make the RPE healthy we must know how those cells work. That is the world of physiology. It includes everything that pertains to how living organisms function.

The word for sickness is pathophysiology. Pathos is from the Greek and means sickness.  

So, what is the pathophysiology of the RPE in macular degeneration and how are we able to improve the health of RPE cells? 

The current guidelines for treating macular degeneration involves the recommendation of the AREDS formulation that includes vitamins and minerals such as Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Zinc, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Copper.  

While the AREDS formulation may be beneficial in delaying blindness for some, it falls short of being a solution. (In fact, AREDS only may help 5.9% of patients. With Advanced Wellness, we are seeing time and time again that we can do more.)

Improving the health of the RPE is much more complicated than that.

We now explain how to make the RPE cells healthier.

Before explaining our 20+ year clinical approach to macular degeneration, there is an important point to be made regarding RPE cells. Our approach to improving the health of RPE cells in your eye applies to every cell in your body. All cells can benefit. Therefore, when we improve the health of RPE cells, we are also improving the health of cells throughout the body, which is why you will likely see improvement in other symptoms and conditions. This approach can be broadly viewed as anti-aging, functional medicine, natural medicine or advanced wellness medicine.


YOUR PERSONALIZED CARE PLANS

The first phase of our approach is to utilize testing and a comprehensive health history evaluation to identify physiologic factors that are contributing to your risk of macular degeneration and other conditions that you may have or be at risk of acquiring.

The process begins with an evaluation of your health history.
Next, you will complete a comprehensive blood chemistry test panel. We are especially interested in assessing your hormone levels as hormone decline is associated with a number of age related health risks for individuals over the age of 55. Hormone decline is an unfortunate part of the aging process, and macular degeneration is an age-related disease. We measure your hormones and associated blood chemistry, identify deficiencies and recommend the appropriate hormone replacement program to provide the optimal levels of hormones to support healthy aging. Problem stated problem solved.

Another blood test we recommend is a methylation biochemistry test. Methylation is a crucial biochemical pathway in that directly impacts the health of the cells in your body. Testing, identifying and addressing methylation issues can help improve cellular health in a number of ways. One key way that methylation can impact macular degeneration is through the interaction of methylation pathway biomolecules and the gene regulation of VEGF. VEGF is signaling protein involved in the pathogenesis of wet macular degeneration.  

Why methylation biochemistry and your hormones matter.

The methylation test also allows for the assessment of your degree of oxidative stress and in turn, inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation are key drivers of unhealthy aging and disease, which includes macular degeneration.

Nutrition is another crucial driver of cellular health. We perform a comprehensive review of your dietary patterns, nutritional genetic risk factors and when indicated, food sensitivity testing. Our dietitians will guide you through the process of implementing the dietary modifications that will help improve the health of your RPE cells and the other cells of your body. 

The more data we have, the better we can define your care plan to help improve your health.


What has our experience been with other patients?

When we first starting working with eye patients using this approach over ten years ago, we were primarily focused on slowing down the progression of macular degeneration.  

To our delight, we began to receive feedback from patients that included vision improvements when entering dark settings such as a movie theater. As we all know, entering a dark movie theater is a challenge for our eyes because we need to be able to switch from bright light to low light. This is called dark adaptation. Today there exists a test to detect early macular degeneration by examining dark adaption.  

The conventional approach to nutritional therapy (AREDS) for slowing the progression of macular degeneration only slows vision loss in 1 in 17 individuals. Unfortunately, this approach does not improve vision and it does not prevent the disease from developing.  

Much of what you have read up to now pertains to dry macular degeneration. If you had asked me four years ago if we could help wet macular degeneration I would have said no. Wet macular degeneration is different than dry macular degeneration. Wet macular degeneration involves the invasion of blood vessels through the RPE and under the macula. It’s a very serious problem and is a cause of severe vision loss and blindness. In the past, we would apply a laser to the new blood vessels in an effort to save vision. Unfortunately, the laser would also damage the macula, which would cause blind spots.

We never anticipated that our advanced wellness approach would help wet macular degeneration.

Until Pat.

Pat had wet macular degeneration and was being treated with the current standard in wet macular degeneration care. Pat's medications were injected into her eye every six weeks. These injections lower VEGF levels in the eye, which in turn helps slow the progression of the disease (and vision loss). The problem is that after 6 months of injections, the therapy was NOT working. Pat's wet macular degeneration was progressing.

Pat enrolled in our program as a last resort, with little hope that her advanced wellness program would help. But it did. Pat’s injections started working, and after six months her eye health (and RPE cells) improved so much that her retina doctor stopped giving her the anti-VEGF injections. AMAZING. She is now four years out and has not required an injection. Pat's amazing story was covered on a local news station in Cleveland.

How were we able to help Pat convert from wet back to dry macular degeneration? The short answer is that our program likely lowered inflammation and VEGF in the eye.  

That is the story behind the macular program. We look forward to working with you to help improve the health of your eyes and your body.

Start understanding what macular degeneration treatment and overall health personalized care plan you need by completing your online medical history. Secure. HIPAA Compliant.
The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a very active layer of cells. The cell's role it is to keep the photoreceptors working correctly. When the RPE cells start to deteriorate, vision declines.

So naturally, a possible pathway to prevention for macular degeneration involves optimizing the health of these critical cells.

Does that make sense? It is worth repeating... 

The possible pathway to preventing macular degeneration is through optimizing the health of the RPE cells.

To make the RPE healthy we must know how those cells work. That is the world of physiology. It includes everything that pertains to how living organisms function.

The word for sickness is pathophysiology. Pathos is from the Greek and means sickness.  

So, what is the pathophysiology of the RPE in macular degeneration and how are we able to improve the health of RPE cells? 

The current guidelines for treating macular degeneration involves the recommendation of the AREDS formulation that includes vitamins and minerals such as Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Zinc, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Copper.  

While the AREDS formulation may be beneficial in delaying blindness for some, it falls short of being a solution. (In fact, AREDS only may help 5.9% of patients. With Advanced Wellness, we are seeing time and time again that we can do more.)

Improving the health of the RPE is much more complicated than that.

We now explain how to make the RPE cells healthier.

Before explaining our 20+ year clinical approach to macular degeneration, there is an important point to be made regarding RPE cells. Our approach to improving the health of RPE cells in your eye applies to every cell in your body. All cells can benefit. Therefore, when we improve the health of RPE cells, we are also improving the health of cells throughout the body, which is why you will likely see improvement in other symptoms and conditions. This approach can be broadly viewed as anti-aging, functional medicine, natural medicine or advanced wellness medicine.


YOUR PERSONALIZED CARE PLANS

The first phase of our approach is to utilize testing and a comprehensive health history evaluation to identify physiologic factors that are contributing to your risk of macular degeneration and other conditions that you may have or be at risk of acquiring.

The process begins with an evaluation of your health history.

Next, you will complete a comprehensive blood chemistry test panel. We are especially interested in assessing your hormone levels as hormone decline is associated with a number of age related health risks for individuals over the age of 55. Hormone decline is an unfortunate part of the aging process, and macular degeneration is an age-related disease. We measure your hormones and associated blood chemistry, identify deficiencies and recommend the appropriate hormone replacement program to provide the optimal levels of hormones to support healthy aging. Problem stated problem solved.

Another blood test we recommend is a methylation biochemistry test. Methylation is a crucial biochemical pathway in that directly impacts the health of the cells in your body. Testing, identifying and addressing methylation issues can help improve cellular health in a number of ways. One key way that methylation can impact macular degeneration is through the interaction of methylation pathway biomolecules and the gene regulation of VEGF. VEGF is signaling protein involved in the pathogenesis of wet macular degeneration.  

Why methylation biochemistry and your hormones matter.

The methylation test also allows for the assessment of your degree of oxidative stress and in turn, inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation are key drivers of unhealthy aging and disease, which includes macular degeneration.

Nutrition is another crucial driver of cellular health. We perform a comprehensive review of your dietary patterns, nutritional genetic risk factors and when indicated, food sensitivity testing. Our dietitians will guide you through the process of implementing the dietary modifications that will help improve the health of your RPE cells and the other cells of your body. 

The more data we have, the better we can define your care plan to help improve your health.


What has our experience been with other patients?

When we first starting working with eye patients using this approach over ten years ago, we were primarily focused on slowing down the progression of macular degeneration.  

To our delight, we began to receive feedback from patients that included vision improvements when entering dark settings such as a movie theater. As we all know, entering a dark movie theater is a challenge for our eyes because we need to be able to switch from bright light to low light. This is called dark adaptation. Today there exists a test to detect early macular degeneration by examining dark adaption.  

The conventional approach to nutritional therapy (AREDS) for slowing the progression of macular degeneration only slows vision loss in 1 in 17 individuals. Unfortunately, this approach does not improve vision and it does not prevent the disease from developing.  

Much of what you have read up to now pertains to dry macular degeneration. If you had asked me four years ago if we could help wet macular degeneration I would have said no. Wet macular degeneration is different than dry macular degeneration. Wet macular degeneration involves the invasion of blood vessels through the RPE and under the macula. It’s a very serious problem and is a cause of severe vision loss and blindness. In the past, we would apply a laser to the new blood vessels in an effort to save vision. Unfortunately, the laser would also damage the macula, which would cause blind spots.

We never anticipated that our advanced wellness approach would help wet macular degeneration.

Until Pat.

Pat had wet macular degeneration and was being treated with the current standard in wet macular degeneration care. Pat's medications were injected into her eye every six weeks. These injections lower VEGF levels in the eye, which in turn helps slow the progression of the disease (and vision loss). The problem is that after 6 months of injections, the therapy was NOT working. Pat's wet macular degeneration was progressing.

Pat enrolled in our program as a last resort, with little hope that her advanced wellness program would help. But it did. Pat’s injections started working, and after six months her eye health (and RPE cells) improved so much that her retina doctor stopped giving her the anti-VEGF injections. AMAZING. She is now four years out and has not required an injection. Pat's amazing story was covered on a local news station in Cleveland.

How were we able to help Pat convert from wet back to dry macular degeneration? The short answer is that our program likely lowered inflammation and VEGF in the eye.  

That is the story behind the macular program. We look forward to working with you to help improve the health of your eyes and your body.

Start understanding what macular degeneration treatment and overall health personalized care plan you need by completing your online medical history. Secure. HIPAA Compliant.
George W. Rozakis, MD

Dr. Rozakis is a board certified biomedical engineer who studied medicine at Cornell Medical Center and studied Ophthalmology at the Duke Eye Center.

Dr. Rozakis worked in the field of Advanced Wellness for over 15 years. He has applied this science to many conditions but most notably to macular degeneration and patients with migraine. Dr. Rozakis won the advancements in healthcare award in Cleveland, Ohio (beating out the Cleveland Clinic) in 2015 for his work in Advanced Wellness and advocates for this approach to health care to his patients and colleagues.

Dr. Rozakis pioneered the field of Lasik refractive surgery, phakic refractive lenses, and the use of hormones and other advanced testing to treat macular degeneration. He wrote a textbook on refractive surgery and holds multiple patents. He was one of the first surgeons in the world to perform LASIK. In 1998, he was voted by his peers to receive an international award for his contributions to LASIK refractive surgery. Dr. Rozakis published an extensive textbook on refractive surgery that was read throughout the world and even translated into Japanese.

Brian Bakke, Ph.D.

Dr. Bakke serves as a science advisor to the Macular Program. Dr. Bakke holds a PhD in bio-organic chemistry and his thesis work focused on the development of DNA alkylating agents for use as drug delivery systems. His post-doctoral work was focused on the development of iso-adenosine analogues as methylation pathway inhibitors for use as chemotherapeutic agents.

Dr. Bakke also holds a master’s degree in human nutrition from Columbia University. His master’s thesis work focused on studying the clinical nutrition practice patterns used by eye professionals in the prevention and treatment of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (AMD). In conjunction with his master's thesis work, Dr. Bakke completed a 1-year clinical nutrition program for health professionals through Columbia University Medical Center and the Institute of Human Nutrition.    

Prior to partnering with the Macular Program, Dr. Bakke spent 6 years working as chief science officer with a medical consulting company. His work as chief science officer focused on collaborating with primary care physicians in developing personalized nutrition and bioidentical hormone based care plans for improving clinical outcomes for patients with complex medical conditions. Previously, Dr. Bakke spent 7 years working with the multi-national chemistry, biotechnology and life science companies BASF and Syngenta as a senior chemist. 
Sajad Zalzala, M.D.

Board Certified in Family Medicine, Dr. Sajad Zalzala joined Dr. Rozakis' mission for Advanced Wellness in epigenetics to be at the forefront of not only technological innovation but towards the movement toward more personalized health, fitness, and medicine.

With special interests in Holistic and Functional Medicine and a background in Computer Science, his philosophy towards health focuses on identifying structural imbalances that influence disease, and defining the underlying causes of poor health—not just the sum of the symptoms. 

Combining his experience and practice, he believes quantifying the healthcare experience can lead to quicker and more lasting change. 
Scott Sedlacek, OD

Dr. Scott is proud to have grown up right in this area and now enjoys being able to contribute to the community from which he came. He moved to Olmsted Township in 2004 and resides here with his wife, Kim, and their combined five children.

His first job while at Berea High School was actually working for an eye doctor, and that’s when he knew it was his calling. Throughout his four years at Miami University, and then four years at The Ohio State University, he worked in several Optometry offices gaining experience. In 1998 he became an Optometrist himself and has truly enjoyed his chosen profession every day since.

Immediately upon beginning his practice he returned to the area where he grew up and began volunteering a tremendous amount of time through several organizations. His goal was to positively benefit the lives of others. His efforts have expanded state-wide where annually he now offers career day programs to over 1,000 students, completes free vision screenings for over 2,000 students, and in addition presents various educational programs to another 2,000 students in 50 different schools.

Dr. Scott has run several marathons, completed a triathlon, and also a 50K trail race. He enjoys playing soccer, golf, and instruments including the guitar. He roots for all Cleveland sports teams, The Buckeyes, and The Chelsea Futbol Club. He also enjoys riding motorcycles and dirt bikes with his son.

Tori Eaton, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist

Tori received her Bachelor of Science in Dietetics and Nutrition from Missouri State University. She finished her graduate certificate from Iowa State University where she completed over 1,200 hours of supervised practice in clinical and community nutrition, including a month of research in rural India. She’s an active member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and Dietitians in Integrative and Functional Medicine, and she's currently enrolled in the Integrative and Functional Nutrition Certified Practitioner course. She has over 3 years of experience with therapeutic diets, chronic pain, irritable bowel syndrome, autoimmune diseases and weight management.


The Science & Our Clinical Story
A problem well stated is a problem half solved. 

What is the problem with macular degeneration?  

Let’s answer. 

The problem that defines macular degeneration is sickness of the retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE). 

These are important cells that sit underneath the photoreceptor cells of the macula, which are the light-sensitive cells that allow for vision. 

Here are pictures of the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells below the photoreceptors rods and cones.
The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a very active layer of cells. The cell's role it is to keep the photoreceptors working correctly. When the RPE cells start to deteriorate, vision declines.

So naturally, a possible pathway to prevention for macular degeneration involves optimizing the health of these critical cells.

Does that make sense? It is worth repeating... 

The possible pathway to preventing macular degeneration is through optimizing the health of the RPE cells.

To make the RPE healthy we must know how those cells work. That is the world of physiology. It includes everything that pertains to how living organisms function.

The word for sickness is pathophysiology. Pathos is from the Greek and means sickness.  

So, what is the pathophysiology of the RPE in macular degeneration and how are we able to improve the health of RPE cells? 

The current guidelines for treating macular degeneration involves the recommendation of the AREDS formulation that includes vitamins and minerals such as Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Zinc, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Copper.  

While the AREDS formulation may be beneficial in delaying blindness for some, it falls short of being a solution. (In fact, AREDS only may help 5.9% of patients. With Advanced Wellness, we are seeing time and time again that we can do more.)

Improving the health of the RPE is much more complicated than that.

We now explain how to make the RPE cells healthier.

Before explaining our 20+ year clinical approach to macular degeneration, there is an important point to be made regarding RPE cells. Our approach to improving the health of RPE cells in your eye applies to every cell in your body. All cells can benefit. Therefore, when we improve the health of RPE cells, we are also improving the health of cells throughout the body, which is why you will likely see improvement in other symptoms and conditions. This approach can be broadly viewed as anti-aging, functional medicine, natural medicine or advanced wellness medicine.


YOUR PERSONALIZED CARE PLANS

The first phase of our approach is to utilize testing and a comprehensive health history evaluation to identify physiologic factors that are contributing to your risk of macular degeneration and other conditions that you may have or be at risk of acquiring.

The process begins with an evaluation of your health history.
Next, you will complete a comprehensive blood chemistry test panel. We are especially interested in assessing your hormone levels as hormone decline is associated with a number of age related health risks for individuals over the age of 55. Hormone decline is an unfortunate part of the aging process, and macular degeneration is an age-related disease. We measure your hormones and associated blood chemistry, identify deficiencies and recommend the appropriate hormone replacement program to provide the optimal levels of hormones to support healthy aging. Problem stated problem solved.

Another blood test we recommend is a methylation biochemistry test. Methylation is a crucial biochemical pathway in that directly impacts the health of the cells in your body. Testing, identifying and addressing methylation issues can help improve cellular health in a number of ways. One key way that methylation can impact macular degeneration is through the interaction of methylation pathway biomolecules and the gene regulation of VEGF. VEGF is signaling protein involved in the pathogenesis of wet macular degeneration.  

Why methylation biochemistry and your hormones matter.

The methylation test also allows for the assessment of your degree of oxidative stress and in turn, inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation are key drivers of unhealthy aging and disease, which includes macular degeneration.

Nutrition is another crucial driver of cellular health. We perform a comprehensive review of your dietary patterns, nutritional genetic risk factors and when indicated, food sensitivity testing. Our dietitians will guide you through the process of implementing the dietary modifications that will help improve the health of your RPE cells and the other cells of your body. 

The more data we have, the better we can define your care plan to help improve your health.


What has our experience been with other patients?

When we first starting working with eye patients using this approach over ten years ago, we were primarily focused on slowing down the progression of macular degeneration.  

To our delight, we began to receive feedback from patients that included vision improvements when entering dark settings such as a movie theater. As we all know, entering a dark movie theater is a challenge for our eyes because we need to be able to switch from bright light to low light. This is called dark adaptation. Today there exists a test to detect early macular degeneration by examining dark adaption.  

The conventional approach to nutritional therapy (AREDS) for slowing the progression of macular degeneration only slows vision loss in 1 in 17 individuals. Unfortunately, this approach does not improve vision and it does not prevent the disease from developing.  

Much of what you have read up to now pertains to dry macular degeneration. If you had asked me four years ago if we could help wet macular degeneration I would have said no. Wet macular degeneration is different than dry macular degeneration. Wet macular degeneration involves the invasion of blood vessels through the RPE and under the macula. It’s a very serious problem and is a cause of severe vision loss and blindness. In the past, we would apply a laser to the new blood vessels in an effort to save vision. Unfortunately, the laser would also damage the macula, which would cause blind spots.

We never anticipated that our advanced wellness approach would help wet macular degeneration.

Until Pat.

Pat had wet macular degeneration and was being treated with the current standard in wet macular degeneration care. Pat's medications were injected into her eye every six weeks. These injections lower VEGF levels in the eye, which in turn helps slow the progression of the disease (and vision loss). The problem is that after 6 months of injections, the therapy was NOT working. Pat's wet macular degeneration was progressing.

Pat enrolled in our program as a last resort, with little hope that her advanced wellness program would help. But it did. Pat’s injections started working, and after six months her eye health (and RPE cells) improved so much that her retina doctor stopped giving her the anti-VEGF injections. AMAZING. She is now four years out and has not required an injection. Pat's amazing story was covered on a local news station in Cleveland.

How were we able to help Pat convert from wet back to dry macular degeneration? The short answer is that our program likely lowered inflammation and VEGF in the eye.  

That is the story behind the macular program. We look forward to working with you to help improve the health of your eyes and your body.

Start understanding what macular degeneration treatment and overall health personalized care plan you need by completing your online medical history. Secure. HIPAA Compliant.
The retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a very active layer of cells. The cell's role it is to keep the photoreceptors working correctly. When the RPE cells start to deteriorate, vision declines.

So naturally, a possible pathway to prevention for macular degeneration involves optimizing the health of these critical cells.

Does that make sense? It is worth repeating... 

The possible pathway to preventing macular degeneration is through optimizing the health of the RPE cells.

To make the RPE healthy we must know how those cells work. That is the world of physiology. It includes everything that pertains to how living organisms function.

The word for sickness is pathophysiology. Pathos is from the Greek and means sickness.  

So, what is the pathophysiology of the RPE in macular degeneration and how are we able to improve the health of RPE cells? 

The current guidelines for treating macular degeneration involves the recommendation of the AREDS formulation that includes vitamins and minerals such as Lutein, Zeaxanthin, Zinc, Vitamin C, Vitamin E and Copper.  

While the AREDS formulation may be beneficial in delaying blindness for some, it falls short of being a solution. (In fact, AREDS only may help 5.9% of patients. With Advanced Wellness, we are seeing time and time again that we can do more.)

Improving the health of the RPE is much more complicated than that.

We now explain how to make the RPE cells healthier.

Before explaining our 20+ year clinical approach to macular degeneration, there is an important point to be made regarding RPE cells. Our approach to improving the health of RPE cells in your eye applies to every cell in your body. All cells can benefit. Therefore, when we improve the health of RPE cells, we are also improving the health of cells throughout the body, which is why you will likely see improvement in other symptoms and conditions. This approach can be broadly viewed as anti-aging, functional medicine, natural medicine or advanced wellness medicine.


YOUR PERSONALIZED CARE PLANS

The first phase of our approach is to utilize testing and a comprehensive health history evaluation to identify physiologic factors that are contributing to your risk of macular degeneration and other conditions that you may have or be at risk of acquiring.

The process begins with an evaluation of your health history.

Next, you will complete a comprehensive blood chemistry test panel. We are especially interested in assessing your hormone levels as hormone decline is associated with a number of age related health risks for individuals over the age of 55. Hormone decline is an unfortunate part of the aging process, and macular degeneration is an age-related disease. We measure your hormones and associated blood chemistry, identify deficiencies and recommend the appropriate hormone replacement program to provide the optimal levels of hormones to support healthy aging. Problem stated problem solved.

Another blood test we recommend is a methylation biochemistry test. Methylation is a crucial biochemical pathway in that directly impacts the health of the cells in your body. Testing, identifying and addressing methylation issues can help improve cellular health in a number of ways. One key way that methylation can impact macular degeneration is through the interaction of methylation pathway biomolecules and the gene regulation of VEGF. VEGF is signaling protein involved in the pathogenesis of wet macular degeneration.  

Why methylation biochemistry and your hormones matter.

The methylation test also allows for the assessment of your degree of oxidative stress and in turn, inflammation. Oxidative stress and inflammation are key drivers of unhealthy aging and disease, which includes macular degeneration.

Nutrition is another crucial driver of cellular health. We perform a comprehensive review of your dietary patterns, nutritional genetic risk factors and when indicated, food sensitivity testing. Our dietitians will guide you through the process of implementing the dietary modifications that will help improve the health of your RPE cells and the other cells of your body. 

The more data we have, the better we can define your care plan to help improve your health.


What has our experience been with other patients?

When we first starting working with eye patients using this approach over ten years ago, we were primarily focused on slowing down the progression of macular degeneration.  

To our delight, we began to receive feedback from patients that included vision improvements when entering dark settings such as a movie theater. As we all know, entering a dark movie theater is a challenge for our eyes because we need to be able to switch from bright light to low light. This is called dark adaptation. Today there exists a test to detect early macular degeneration by examining dark adaption.  

The conventional approach to nutritional therapy (AREDS) for slowing the progression of macular degeneration only slows vision loss in 1 in 17 individuals. Unfortunately, this approach does not improve vision and it does not prevent the disease from developing.  

Much of what you have read up to now pertains to dry macular degeneration. If you had asked me four years ago if we could help wet macular degeneration I would have said no. Wet macular degeneration is different than dry macular degeneration. Wet macular degeneration involves the invasion of blood vessels through the RPE and under the macula. It’s a very serious problem and is a cause of severe vision loss and blindness. In the past, we would apply a laser to the new blood vessels in an effort to save vision. Unfortunately, the laser would also damage the macula, which would cause blind spots.

We never anticipated that our advanced wellness approach would help wet macular degeneration.

Until Pat.

Pat had wet macular degeneration and was being treated with the current standard in wet macular degeneration care. Pat's medications were injected into her eye every six weeks. These injections lower VEGF levels in the eye, which in turn helps slow the progression of the disease (and vision loss). The problem is that after 6 months of injections, the therapy was NOT working. Pat's wet macular degeneration was progressing.

Pat enrolled in our program as a last resort, with little hope that her advanced wellness program would help. But it did. Pat’s injections started working, and after six months her eye health (and RPE cells) improved so much that her retina doctor stopped giving her the anti-VEGF injections. AMAZING. She is now four years out and has not required an injection. Pat's amazing story was covered on a local news station in Cleveland.

How were we able to help Pat convert from wet back to dry macular degeneration? The short answer is that our program likely lowered inflammation and VEGF in the eye.  

That is the story behind the macular program. We look forward to working with you to help improve the health of your eyes and your body.

Start understanding what macular degeneration treatment and overall health personalized care plan you need by completing your online medical history. Secure. HIPAA Compliant.
LEARN MORE
SUPPORT
440-777-2667
LICENCES LOCATIONS
Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Ontario, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Nevada, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Virginia, Washington State, Wisconsin
SEE WITH US
Share the Vision

#MacularProgram
© 2018 MacularProgram. All Rights Reserved.   Privacy   Terms